Food Insecurity in Urban Areas Bibliography

Introduction

Food insecurity affects many urban neighborhoods worldwide. The inability to afford nutritious food is a significant public health issue. Urban food insecurity is growing and can harm people. Food insecure households are more likely to have obesity, diabetes, and other diet-related diseases, according to research. Due to a lack of inexpensive and healthy dietary options, urban residents are more likely to develop these diseases. Due to financial and dietary stress, food-insecure persons may develop anxiety and depression. After reading various articles, I shall analyze food insecurity in cities and possible solutions in this essay.

Bibliography

Headey, D., Goudet, S., Lambrecht, I., Maffioli, E. M., Oo, T. Z., & Russell, T. (2022). Poverty and food insecurity during COVID-19: Phone-survey evidence from rural and urban Myanmar in 2020. Global Food Security33, 100626. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2022.100626. In order to determine the level of poverty and food insecurity during the pandemic, this study used phone surveys conducted in 2020 among Myanmar’s rural and urban populations. According to the findings, there were instances where urban food insecurity exceeded that of rural food insecurity, and since 2018, things have gotten worse. The results imply that the decline of participant assets and job uncertainty may be the primary causes of the worsening of food insecurity in metropolitan regions. The study also revealed that food insecurity was highest in the poorest households (those with a daily income of less than $3 US). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the sexes. The authors stress the necessity to ensure the efficacy of such tactics in light of the present food crisis and offer solutions to alleviate food insecurity in urban settings, such as income-support programs to enable disadvantaged households to get food (Headey et al., 2022).

Tacoli, C. (2019). The urbanization of food insecurity and malnutrition. Environment and Urbanization31(2), 371–374. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819867255. This article comprehensively examines studies on food insecurity and malnutrition in urban regions, along with an analysis of relevant policies and initiatives. The author emphasizes the scarcity of dependable and comprehensive data regarding the magnitude of urban food insecurity. They point out significant differences within cities and populations, frequently concealed by average figures and combined statistics. The essay highlights the significance of urban planning, urban agriculture initiatives, and employment resources in enhancing food security (Tacoli, 2019).

This article also underscores the influence of gender, income, and other social variables on urban food insecurity and malnutrition. In addition, the paper explores tactics for achieving sustainable urban growth that simultaneously tackles food security concerns, including enhancing food availability and distribution, alleviating poverty, and fostering employment opportunities. The study finishes by emphasizing the significance of acknowledging urban food insecurity’s complex and dynamic character, encompassing multiple dimensions and sectors.

Sisha, T. A. (2020). Household level food insecurity assessment: Evidence from panel data, Ethiopia. Scientific Africanp. 7, e00262. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sciaf.2019.e00262. This study uses panel data to examine the factors contributing to food insecurity in urban regions of Ethiopia. The findings suggest that many household attributes, including income, education level, land ownership status, and environmental factors, significantly impact food insecurity among urban households in Ethiopia. The study specifically discovered a decrease in food insecurity within the observed time frame, notably linked to higher levels of educational attainment. The authors highlight the importance of educating individuals in urban households to enhance their food security in addition to existing measures to reduce food insecurity (Sisha, 2020). Furthermore, implementing policies that specifically target the fundamental root causes of food insecurity, such as poverty, can effectively diminish the occurrence of food insecurity within urban areas.

Anand, S., Jagadeesh, K., Adelina, C., & Koduganti, J. (2019). Urban food insecurity and its determinants: A baseline study of Bengaluru. Environment and Urbanization31(2), 421-442. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819861899. This study assessed the magnitude of food insecurity in Bengaluru, India, and determined the main factors linked to it. The findings revealed that food insecurity at the local level is a widespread problem in urban Bengaluru, with households having approximately a 20% greater likelihood of experiencing food insecurity compared to homes in rural areas (Anand et al., 2019). Poverty, unemployment, limited financial understanding and assistance, insufficient education, advanced household age, and bigger household size were found to be highly associated with increased food insecurity. This study provided a significant understanding of India’s current urban food poverty picture and emphasized the importance of directing efforts toward minimizing food insecurity in urban areas. Resolving food insecurity in urban areas can be accomplished by implementing initiatives such as increasing economic opportunities, strengthening social protection and assistance programs, improving access to safety nets, and upgrading infrastructure.

McLoughlin, G. M., McCarthy, J. A., McGuirt, J. T., Singleton, C. R., Dunn, C. G., & Gadhoke, P. (2020). Addressing food insecurity through a health equity lens: a case study of large urban school districts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Urban Healthpp. 97, 759–775. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11524-020-00476-0. This article scrutinizes the problem of food insecurity in main metropolitan school districts during the COVID-19 epidemic, focusing on health equity. The authors employ a case study to examine the ramifications of food insecurity on students, staff, and family members within school districts and delineate methods that these districts might implement to tackle the issue of food insecurity. The results of this article indicate that numerous metropolitan school districts continue to face the issue of restricted food availability despite endeavors to encourage the provision of meals, food pantries, and other support services (McLoughlin et al., 2020). The results additionally indicate the necessity of prioritizing strengthening current links between local food banks and community organizations, as well as federal nutrition programs, which should be done alongside efforts to enhance food’s physical and financial availability. The authors highlight the necessity of adopting a comprehensive and multisectoral strategy to tackle food insecurity during the pandemic.

Murrell, A., & Jones, R. (2020). Measuring food insecurity using the food abundance index: Implications for economic, health and social well-being. International journal of environmental research and public health17(7), 2434. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072434. This article uses the food abundance index to measure the extent of food insecurity in metropolitan areas. The outcomes of this study suggest that food insecurity is a distinguished concern in urban settings, mainly influenced by wealth, education, and employment inequality. The authors pointed out the significance of employing the food abundance index to evaluate food insecurity concerning the quantity, quality, and accessibility of food and the conventional measure of household food insecurity. This article additionally outlines treatments and tactics to tackle the issue of urban food insecurity, including implementing cash transfer programs, enhancing the availability of fresh and nutritious food, and supporting initiatives to promote food literacy. The authors emphasize that promoting healthy, sustainable, and equitable food systems is crucial in tackling urban food insecurity and improving economic, health, and social well-being (Murrell & Jones, 2020).

Bhuyan, B., Sahoo, B. K., & Suar, D. (2020). Food insecurity dynamics in India: A synthetic panel approach. Social Sciences & Humanities Open2(1), 100029. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssaho.2020.100029. This study used a synthetic panel approach to look into food insecurity in India. The results showed a strong affiliation between food insecurity in rural and urban areas and poverty, the educational achievement of household heads, and work prestige. In addition, the results showed that compared to those in rural areas, those in urban areas were more likely to suffer from food insecurity (Bhuyan et al., 2020). In order to resolve the issue of food insecurity in India, particularly in urban areas, the authors stressed in their conclusion the necessity for new strategies and policies. The authors also proposed several strategies to minimize food insecurity, including implementing gender-sensitive approaches, reinforcing safety nets and targeted social programs, enhancing nutritional infrastructure, and prioritizing access to a nutritious diet.

Conclusion

In conclusion, food insecurity is a huge problem that affects cities all around the world. The difference in development between those who have access to appropriate resources and those who do not can be exacerbated by it, and it can worsen people’s physical and mental well-being. However, several approaches may be taken to solve this problem, such as enacting laws and establishing charitable organizations that provide low-income individuals with access to meals that are both affordable and nutritious. By conducting research into potential solutions and gaining an understanding of the causes and consequences of the issue, it is possible to minimize the occurrence of food insecurity in urban environments.

References

Anand, S., Jagadeesh, K., Adelina, C., & Koduganti, J. (2019). Urban food insecurity and its determinants: A baseline study of Bengaluru. Environment and Urbanization31(2), 421-442. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819861899

Bhuyan, B., Sahoo, B. K., & Suar, D. (2020). Food insecurity dynamics in India: A synthetic panel approach. Social Sciences & Humanities Open2(1), 100029. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssaho.2020.100029

Headey, D., Goudet, S., Lambrecht, I., Maffioli, E. M., Oo, T. Z., & Russell, T. (2022). Poverty and food insecurity during COVID-19: Phone-survey evidence from rural and urban Myanmar in 2020. Global Food Security33, 100626. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2022.100626

McLoughlin, G. M., McCarthy, J. A., McGuirt, J. T., Singleton, C. R., Dunn, C. G., & Gadhoke, P. (2020). Addressing food insecurity through a health equity lens: a case study of large urban school districts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Urban Healthpp. 97, 759–775. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11524-020-00476-0

Murrell, A., & Jones, R. (2020). Measuring food insecurity using the food abundance index: Implications for economic, health and social well-being. International journal of environmental research and public health17(7), 2434. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072434

Sisha, T. A. (2020). Household level food insecurity assessment: Evidence from panel data, Ethiopia. Scientific Africanp. 7, e00262. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sciaf.2019.e00262

Tacoli, C. (2019). The urbanization of food insecurity and malnutrition. Environment and Urbanization31(2), 371–374. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819867255

Author: Josh Kurpius
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