Mental Health in Children and Adolescents

Did you know that mental health issues have increased rampantly in the past few years? Mental health is essential for children and adolescents because of its implications for people and society. Infants and adolescents develop most mental health difficulties while growing up, which may last a lifetime. These issues are growing globally, impacting 20% of children and adolescents. Mental health issues should be addressed with much caution since they affect the lives of young children and adolescents until they grow into adults. However, many therapies neglect the issue’s complexity and focus on individual solutions. Therefore, understanding the need to address mental health issues in children and adolescents through exploring different research from scholars such as Shah et al., Landstedt, Bortes, and Strandh is crucial.

To begin with, children’s and adolescents’ mental health impacts society. Mental health difficulties often begin in infancy or adolescence and may influence individuals and communities for life, according to the WHO. Several factors keep this age group with mental health concerns, such as academic stress and social pressures, which might worsen anxiety and depression. Also, family dysfunctions such as abuse and neglect may affect mental health. Again, stressful circumstances like violence or grief may also increase mental health issues. In addition, multiple mental health concerns are also inherited, according to studies. Despite its significance, children and adolescents, particularly low-income ones, seldom get mental health treatment due to a lack of social amenities or funds to pay for their medical expenses.

Notably, young people’s mental health issues are becoming a nationwide pandemic that requires prompt government intervention. According to Shah et al.’s 2022 Pediatric Research study, mental health problems are significant and need immediate attention. Again, the study shows how critical comprehensive responses are, which indicates that improved policies and prompt care are required for children’s mental health. Also, the research demonstrates the issue’s gravity. Without immediate action, politicians may fail to treat many young people, causing pain and harming their health (Shah et al. 1208). Therefore, the research makes a compelling case for the need for political action to solve the national crisis in child mental health.

Furthermore, mental problems in teenagers harm more than just their heads since they severely hinder academic performance. In BMC Psychiatry (2021), Landstedt, Bortes, and Strandh’s research found a difference in social performance among school-aged children with mental health. These issues have been shown to impact young people’s feelings and academic achievement. According to Landstedt et al. (2021), “social disparities have a significant impact on youth with mental disorders’ academic performance.” By comprehending this connection, we can see how assisting teenagers with mental health issues improves both their schooling and health (Landstedt et al. 9). Hence, without targeted action, educational disparities and the futures of these young people are in jeopardy.

Moreover, physical and virtual bullying harm children and teens’ mental health, highlighting the need for collaboration to stop it. Li, Chao, et al. studied the adverse effects of bullying on children in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2022). “Traditional bullying and cyberbullying have been associated with significant mental health problems in children and adolescents” (Li et al. 10). Was this discovered? This shocking study indicates that offline and internet bullying harms vulnerable people’s emotions. Because bullying is so severe, a holistic mental health approach for children and teens must address in-person and online bullying. Without this, many young people’s suffering—who require a helpful and safe environment to grow socially and psychologically—is extended. Thus, all types of bullying must cease for young adults’ and teens mental health.

Nevertheless, different people argue that because families and schools need to address the mental health issues of teenagers and young adults, comprehensive legislation is not necessary. This counterargument claims that adequate mental health treatment is provided for children and teenagers by families and schools and that additional laws exacerbate the problem. While families and schools have a significant role in juvenile mental health, relying only on them ignores the complexity of the issue. Also, uneven care, bullying, and external pressures need a more comprehensive strategy. Laws have the power to fully address these issues and provide mental health treatment for all people, particularly those from low-income households.

Conclusively, a comprehensive strategy is necessary to address the numerous mental health issues that affect children and teenagers. Shah et al. advise passing legislation for this national catastrophe. Landstedt, Bortes, and Strandh demonstrate how mental health affects academic achievement. Li, Chao, et al. claim that there are significant ramifications for both offline and online bullying. Our children’s abilities and health are in jeopardy if we overlook these difficulties. Together, families, schools, and legislators can stop bullying and provide mental health services to everyone.

Annotated Bibliography

Landstedt, Evelina, Cristian Bortes, and Mattias Strandh “Is there a social gradient in how youth with mental disorders perform academically? Findings from a Swedish longitudinal register-based study” BMC Psychiatry 21.1 (2021): 1–12.

Mattias Strandh, Cristian Bortes, and Evelina Landstedt did the study, “Do kids from different social classes do worse or better in school when they have mental health problems?” A Swedish continuous register-based study published in BMC Psychiatry in 2021 examines the complex relationship between academic ability and adolescent mental health across socioeconomic gradients. To investigate how socioeconomic background affects juvenile cognitive health-related academic achievement, the study uses a sizable Swedish longitudinal dataset. Sweden is omitted; hence, the findings of this research are more relevant. The authors use continuous data instead of self-reported data to reduce bias and focus on creating individualized therapy for poor teens who are having mental health and school problems (Landstedt et al. 10). Legislators, educators, and medical professionals may find this trustworthy journal article helpful in improving the mental health and academic achievement of kids with mental health issues.

Li, Chao, et al., “Traditional bullying and cyberbullying in the digital age and its associated mental health problems in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis.” European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2022): 1–15.

The 2022 meta-analysis by Li, Chao, et al. examines the effects of TB and CB on children’s mental health. Both in tandem and alone, TB and CB modify bullying. Bullied individuals showed startling rates of anxiety, sadness, suicidal ideation, self-harm, and other mental health issues, which calls for improved bullying response and prevention (Li et al. 12). This meta-analysis of the journal on bullying and child mental health is trustworthy and up-to-date. It also encourages a comprehensive response to this significant public health issue.

Shah, Shetal I., and Pediatric Public Policy Council Shah Shetal 2 Patel Mona 3 Raphael Jean 3 Keller David 4 Chamberlain Lisa 4 Devaskar Sherin U. 5 Cheng Tina 5 Javier Joyce 6 Lee Lois 6. “Legislative remedies to mitigate the national emergency in pediatric mental health” Pediatric Research 92.5 (2022): 1207–1209.

The COVID-19 pandemic and children’s mental health are examined by Shah, Shetal I., and the Pediatric Public Policy Council in “Legislative Remedies to mitigate the national emergency in pediatric mental health,” published in Pediatric Research in 2022. The authors assert that the pandemic has made children’s mental health worse. They believe legislation is the only way to address this national tragedy (Shah et al. 1208). The condition strained the health care system, made children unhappy and worried, and made some mental health therapies more difficult. The authors recommend legislation to address the lack of money, mental health professionals, and treatment. This heartfelt editorial in a well-known publication encourages us to appreciate and safeguard the mental health of our country’s youth and to enforce regulations.

Works Cited

Landstedt, Evelina, Cristian Bortes, and Mattias Strandh “Is there a social gradient in how youth with mental disorders perform academically? Findings from a Swedish longitudinal register-based study” BMC Psychiatry 21.1 (2021): 1–12.

Li, Chao, et al., “Traditional bullying and cyberbullying in the digital age and its associated mental health problems in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis.” European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2022): 1–15.

Shah, Shetal I., and Pediatric Public Policy Council Shah Shetal 2 Patel Mona 3 Raphael Jean 3 Keller David 4 Chamberlain Lisa 4 Devaskar Sherin U. 5 Cheng Tina 5 Javier Joyce 6 Lee Lois 6. “Legislative remedies to mitigate the national emergency in pediatric mental health” Pediatric Research 92.5 (2022): 1207–1209.

Author: Mickey Muennig
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